The well-being of a child is the primary concern of most parents. In the event of divorce, issues regarding child custody, child support and visitation rights should always be made in the best interests of the child. However, there could be some instances that parents harm their children unintentionally when it comes to divorce.

Parents in Massachusetts may be interested in how parents minimize the impact of divorce through divorce mediation. During divorce procedures, there could be times that parents involve their children in court hearings and proceedings. Due to this, these children are unwillingly towed into to complex issues about spousal support, marital property and property division.

Typically, kids and teenagers cannot handle such situations and are emotionally unprepared to deal with such difficult discussions. They may experience emotional stress and trauma from these nerve-racking times. Moreover, children of divorced couples may exhibit later behavioral problems toward other people and may suffer in their academic performance. For these reasons, parents may prefer divorce mediation in order to discuss burdensome issues in a calmer, less emotional environment.

Divorce mediation is an informal option where a neutral mediator assists both parties in negotiating a resolution. During mediation, the mediator will work directly with each party to inform them of legal issues, evaluate options and discuss other information that will be helpful in smoothing the process of divorce.

A mediator’s goal is to help both parties arrive at an agreement. Unlike the court system, mediators may not coerce both parties into agreeing to a settlement. Furthermore, divorce mediation is advantageous to both spouses in terms of financial obligations, privacy concerns, and the future relationship with each other after the divorce. More importantly, divorce mediation will protect children from traumatic situations they may experience from a litigated divorce.

Source: Examiner.com, “Minimizing the impact of divorce on children,” Damir Pogarcic, Oct. 9, 2012