After a divorce, it is not uncommon for one or both spouses to relocate, even if children are involved. Sometimes it is simply a necessity and serves the best interests of all involved. While this may be the case, there are numerous custodial parents who will find that collecting child support payments from parents living out of state can be a frustrating task. However, this is something with which the state of Massachusetts can assist.

Custodial parents who are struggling to collect on existing orders from non-custodial parents who are living out of state may feel that there is little they can do to get the financial support their children need and deserve. Thankfully, they are not alone in their fight. Child support enforcement agencies across the country will work together in order ensure children benefit from the support which has been ordered.

What does one have to do to get help in achieving a support order or enforcement assistance? A petition for child support enforcement services can be filed in Massachusetts by the custodial parent in order to seek assistance in achieving child support. In filing this petition, the state in which the non-custodial parent is currently residing will get involved in the case and any necessary actions to pursue enforcement options can be taken.

Moving out of state does not relieve a non-custodial parent from his or her financial responsibility to his or her children. Those who fail to continue making payments can be held accountable through available enforcement options. While collecting child support from a parent who is living outside the state of Massachusetts tends to take longer than collecting from a parent who is a resident, it is still worth pursuing so that children receive the economic support they deserve. An experienced family law attorney will be able to provide assistance with such situations.

Source: mass.gov, “Parent to Pay Lives in Another State or Outside of the United States: 2. What happens with child support when one parent lives in another state?“, Accessed on March 9, 2017