When your Massachusetts marriage comes to an end, you may have fears about being able to provide for yourself without your spouse. If you stopped working for your spouse, lack the skills employers desire or otherwise have concerns about finding employment, you may decide to pursue alimony in your split.

According to Mass.gov, you have the opportunity to pursue alimony while your divorce is ongoing. You also have the opportunity to do so after-the-fact through a modification. If you are successful in your efforts to secure alimony, it may come in one of four types. Alimony types Massachusetts recognizes are as follows.

General term alimony

If you have come to depend on your former spouse to support you, you may be able to secure general term alimony. In most cases, the duration of the alimony arrangement depends on the length of your marriage.

Rehabilitative alimony

If the court thinks you may be able to support yourself in time, you may be able to get temporary rehabilitative alimony. You may be more likely to get this type of alimony if you are young and possess the skills today’s employers want.

Transitional alimony

If your marriage lasted fewer than five years, you may be able to get transitional alimony. This may come in a one-time payment or regular payments, and it may help you move to a new location or otherwise adjust to your new lifestyle in the absence of your partner.

Reimbursement alimony

Reimbursement alimony may be available if your marriage lasted fewer than five years and you helped finance your spouse’s education or job training.